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It was by all accounts an empowering experience, in which several dozen members from across Council 36 dedicated themselves on a recent Saturday to learning more about the role and responsibilities

A message from Pres. Andy Jung:

Say what?! On August 1, 2018, Los Angeles County negotiators broke a decades-long pattern of funding the cost of standard health care inflation and proposed to freeze the County’s contribution to their employees' (including several thousand AFSCME members) Choices Plan at 2018 levels for the next three years.

The County’s proposal is a major reduction from past practice, a cut of more than $207 million over the term of the employees' Fringe Benefit contract. The County’s proposal would result in a SIGNIFICANT CUT IN TAKE HOME PAY as health insurance premiums grow.

Today, the Los Angeles County Employee Relations Commission (ERCOM) approved AFSCME's petition to be the exclusive bargaining representative for Deputy Public Defenders (Grades I-IV) employed by the Office of the Public Defender. 

This means that the public defenders are now officially unionized, and part of the AFSME District Council 36 family, after many long years without labor representation! 

A cadre of AFSCME members and staff walked door to door and spoke with LA City employees in Local 3090 about the importance of signing up for full AFSCME membership, to assure the union can negotiate for better wages, benefits and working conditions. 

The effort, part of the national AFSCME Strong campaign, was a huge success. 

All it took was an honest conversation, worker to worker.  Many said they would gladly stand with their co-workers because they knew that the union was fighting for them. Several agreed to pose for the camera to express their union pride.

Council 36 hosted nearly 75  activists from a cross section of Los Angeles unions on Saturday, at a first-of-its-kind Labor Network for Sustainability "convergence" designed to focus attention on climate change and what organized labor can - and should - do about it. 

Packing the hall were diverse unions representing nurses, telecommunications workers, oil refinery workers, plumbers and pipe fitters, and countless others.

More than 5,000 delegates and activists -- including over 100 from Council 36 Locals -- gathered in Boston to deliver a message of strength and solidarity last week for AFSCME's 43rd International Convention: We will rise up even in the face of stern challenges, and we will never quit our union. For full convention coverage, check out https://2018.afscme.org/

The Janus case was an attempt to deliver a knockout blow to millions of working people and their families who looked to the Supreme Court as an independent institution that advances equal rights and fundamental freedoms for all.

The Librarians' Guild, AFSCME Local 2626, has submitted a resolution for consideration by AFSCME delegates to the upcoming International Union Convention in Boston, starting July 16. Urging delegates' strong vote of support, Local President Henry Gambill believes it is time for the biggest public employee union in the United States to take on an issue that is potentially the biggest public sector job killer of the near future: Climate change. 

The resolution as drafted for consideration on the convention floor follows:

Climate Change: The Real Job Killer?