News

In a vindication for dozens of AFSCME-represented classified staff at Birmingham Community Charter High School (BCCHS) in the San Fernando Valley,  school

Activists and leaders representing a swath of Council 36 Locals had the opportunity to ask questions of a number of LA County Supervisor candidates about issues and concerns affecting services and

As they say, what doesn't kill you makes you stronger. On the one-year anniversary of the horrible, anti-union Janus v.

An icon of the Los Angeles labor movement, longtime AFSCME District Council 36 Executive Director Cheryl Parisi has announced her retirement.  Parisi will be leaving at the end of May after serving AFSCME for 40 years, including at the helm of Council 36 for the last 16 years. 

Under Parisi's Council 36 leadership, the union became a flagship AFSCME affiliate, recognized for achievements in virtually every aspect of labor representation.  The ranks of Council 36 also grew from 14,000 members to nearly 25,000 during her tenure.

Public service workers across the country are losing their foothold in the middle class. So says an article in The New York Times this week that serves as a reminder of why labor unions are more needed now than ever.

AFSCME Local 685 (LA County Probation Officers) under President Kent Swift, hosted a luminary last week at a general membership meeting: the Rev. James Lawson, an icon of the civil rights movement. 

Everyone appeared mesmerized by the presence of Rev. Lawson, who delivered the invocation before speaking about the plight of the homeless and poor.  He spoke about the need for everyone to "aggressively" work to alleiviate the suffering of poor people and ensure the homeless are sheltered -- because the alternative, he warned, is to commit a sin.

A broad coalition of community groups, clergy and labor spoke on the steps of Los Angeles City Hall today at a successful media event to hold Mayor Garcetti accountable for pledges he has made but not delivered upon -- namely the restoration of City services that were slashed drastically in the Great Recession. The event, organized by the Fix LA Coalition, immediately followed the Mayor's State of the City address

Los Angeles County employees in the Coalition of County Unions (CCU), including a number of AFSCME Locals, took to the street in downtown LA to send a message to the Board of Supervisors ahead of contract negotiations: We expect a fair deal. We are tired of being squeezed.

A famus former staffer with AFSCME, US Rep. Jimmy Gomez, dropped by Council 36 last week to have an informal meeting with our members and describe what life is like as the most freshman member of Congress. Brother Gomez was elected to the state Assembly with our union's support, before moving on to the US Congress.  He said it has been a learning curve, transitioning from Sacramento to Washington, DC, but he is relishing the opportunity to establish new relationships, incuding with conservative lawmakers across the aisle.

A union man through and through,Tim Del Cambre has passed away. He will be greatly missed. 

The President of American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Local 3634, representing MTA Supervisors for the County of Los Angeles, Brother Del Cambre left an indelible mark. He led perhaps the most successful contract campaign ever in his local union, culminating in a 21% raise over five years for his members in July 2017. That contract won 99 percent ratification in a sign of the appreciation he earned from rank and file members.

On April 4, 1968 – half a century ago today – Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr’s life was cut short in Memphis, where he was fighting for dignity and justice on behalf of  black sanitation workers in AFSCME. Today AFSCME honors this heritage. The struggle continues for every oppressed community; for every exploited worker; for every vulnerable resident; for the poor, for the disappearing middle class, and for equality and opportunity for all .