News

The Council 36 Organizing Dept.'s recruitment campaign for Volunteer Member Organizers (VMOs) is in full swing, as AFSCME rank-and-file activists continue to step up to build worker power at the ba

AFSCME-Endorsed Glendora Measure Wins Voter Approval Following Organizing Blitz

Los Angeles City workers and community-based organizations fighting for the restoration of services has ratcheted up their campaign. As seen in this photo taken at a City Hall action last week, AFSCME Local 2626 members (wearing green, at left) admire a banner produced by the Fix LA Coalition.

The message speaks to Mayor Garcetti's pledge, still far from fulfilled, to create 5,000 good civil service jobs. The June 30, 2018 deadline for that to happen has come and gone.

Exciting news! AFSCME District Council 36 has chosen a new Interim Executive Director, Brother Darrin Spann.  

Brother Spann, who is pictured on the right in this photo, hails from Philly, and has a long history in AFSCME, starting as a rank-and-file member who moved up the ranks and served on the Executive Board of his local for nearly a dozen years before being hired as staff by the International Union in 1999. He also has experience with Council 36 and knows many familiar faces here.

It was 10 years ago this month that the 2008 financial crisis kicked into high gear. When storied Wall Street bank Lehman Brothers shut down, bankers walking out of the building carrying cardboard boxes of their possessions made the perfect image for TV cameras.

No politician running for office today would openly advocate for more wealth inequality in our country, where the richest 1 percent of the population owns 40 percent of the wealth. Even candidate Donald Trump in 2016 promised to stand up for the “forgotten men and women of our country,” who feel betrayed by a rigged economic system that benefits a small minority at their expense. Yet every single day, President Trump and congressional leaders seem determined to do more to increase wealth inequality than to alleviate it; do more for corporations and the wealthy than for single parents working two or three jobs to make ends meet.

On Labor Day, AFSCME District Council 36 honors the achievements of working people and the American Labor Movement. Our Union particularly applauds the 20,000-plus Council 36 members across Southern Calfornia who dedicate themselves to bettering our communities in a vast array of job descriptions.

The Executive Board of Council 36 additionally wishes to recognize the staff of Council 36 for their own dedication and tireless work servicing our 60 Local Unions.

It wasn't easy, but their fight paid off with yesterday's historic adoption of a first union contract

The Long Beach Transit Supervisors, represented by Council 36, were ecstatic to see the agency's board of directors unanimously approve their contract on Aug. 27 – three long years after the employees elected to unionize for better pay and benefits. 

Like others around the world, I mourned the death last week of Aretha Franklin. The Queen of Soul set a new standard for enduring classic songs with both artistic and political impact, like her mega-hit “Respect,” which became an anthem for both the civil rights and women’s movements.

And that song is on my mind as we embark on a week of action dedicated to shining light on the stakes for women in the nomination of Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.

AFSCME Local 127, representing San Diego City workers, has won an important victory with the passage of Measure J, a local ballot initiative that mandates the City to more closely monitor private contractors bidding for public work and increases transparency in the outsourcing process.  As a rule, AFSCME supports increased scrutiny of for-profit private contractors, which benefits the public by assuring that outsourcing takes place only after proper due diligence is done.