News

The City of Commerce saw the power of workers standing together at a City Council meeting on March 5, when AFSCME Local 773 members packed the house, demanding equitable treatment, affordable healt

Thanks to the bargaining success of AFSCME negotiators, thousands of Los Angeles County employees in Council 36 Local Unions will be receiving cost-of-living (COLA) increases of 2 percent, effectiv

In an ambitious statewide campaign to organize child care workers, Council 36 is standing with AFSCME's United Domestic Workers union and other labor groups to bring collective bargaining power to

When he first took a job at the Centralia Correctional Center in Illinois, Keith Kracht knew that a career in public service wouldn’t make him a millionaire. But then again, that’s not why he went into public service.

AFSCME President Lee Saunders lashed out at the Trump administration after President Donald Trump signed a series of executive orders to make it easier to fire federal workers and weaken their unions.

Don't fall for the scam.
When AFSCME members stand together, we have power in numbers. Together, we can defend our freedom to take our loved ones to the doctor when they get sick and retire with dignity some day. Together, we have the power to make our voices heard at work and in our democracy. That’s our AFSCME Agenda.

At a recent Los Angeles City Budget and Finance Committee hearing, dozens of AFSCME members and residents showed up to make their "park pride" clear as City budget officials deliberate on restoration of services for the next fiscal year.

An icon of the Los Angeles labor movement, longtime AFSCME District Council 36 Executive Director Cheryl Parisi has announced her retirement.  Parisi will be leaving at the end of May after serving AFSCME for 40 years, including at the helm of Council 36 for the last 16 years. 

Under Parisi's Council 36 leadership, the union became a flagship AFSCME affiliate, recognized for achievements in virtually every aspect of labor representation.  The ranks of Council 36 also grew from 14,000 members to nearly 25,000 during her tenure.

Public service workers across the country are losing their foothold in the middle class. So says an article in The New York Times this week that serves as a reminder of why labor unions are more needed now than ever.

AFSCME Local 685 (LA County Probation Officers) under President Kent Swift, hosted a luminary last week at a general membership meeting: the Rev. James Lawson, an icon of the civil rights movement. 

Everyone appeared mesmerized by the presence of Rev. Lawson, who delivered the invocation before speaking about the plight of the homeless and poor.  He spoke about the need for everyone to "aggressively" work to alleiviate the suffering of poor people and ensure the homeless are sheltered -- because the alternative, he warned, is to commit a sin.